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Saturday, July 2

  1. page Reports From The Field edited ... {Vines3.JPG} Sometimes vines can strangle the trees they grow on {Vines2.JPG} Vines can block …
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    {Vines3.JPG} Sometimes vines can strangle the trees they grow on {Vines2.JPG} Vines can block the road {Vines1.JPG} The most vines EVER
    These vines look pretty cool! But they can make things really tricky. Imagine trying to identify a plant whose leaves could be meters and meters away from the place where you find its roots attached to the ground. It's not easy!
    THORNS
    {Lil_Devil.JPG}

    {Lil_Devil.JPG}
    Ouch! {Carissa_ovata.JPG} It'sIts scientific name
    Much worse!! These mean that even though it was pretty hot, Amanda and I had to wear long pants, long sleeves, and thick protective shoes and gaiters all the time. (Here's what gaiters are.) We nicknamed this plant 'little devil' because it seemed to be poking us all the time! It's somewhere between a bush and a vine. The stems grow everywhere and are very tough to cut through.
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  2. page Reports From The Field edited Welcome to the Forty Mile Scrub So we finally made it to the second field site, the Forty-mile S…

    Welcome to the Forty Mile Scrub So we finally made it to the second field site, the Forty-mile Scrub National Park, in Queensland, NSW. What's it like? Well, this site is a seasonally-dry rainforest. That might sound like a bit of a contradiction: how can a rainforest be dry? Well, the forest here does get a substantial amount of rain, but it has a distinct dry season every year. (That means all of the rain has to come in the wet season, exactly when we're visiting. ::sigh::) It also means that it has plants that are clearly related to ancient rainforest vegetation. These two facts are why I chose this site for my project. I want to see how plants that evolved in a warm place, with plenty of water all year, have adapted to places where the seasons are different: dry, here at the Forty Mile Scrub, or cold, at my other site, in Tasmania.
    Seasonally dry rainforest is known for two things:
    VINES
    {Vines3.JPG} Sometimes vines can strangle the trees they grow on {Vines2.JPG} Vines can block the road {Vines1.JPG} The most vines EVER
    These vines look pretty cool! But they can make things really tricky. Imagine trying to identify a plant whose leaves could be meters and meters away from the place where you find its roots attached to the ground. It's not easy!
    THORNS
    {Lil_Devil.JPG} Ouch! {Carissa_ovata.JPG} It's scientific name is Carissa ovata.
    Much worse!! These mean that even though it was pretty hot, Amanda and I had to wear long pants, long sleeves, and thick protective shoes and gaiters all the time. (Here's what gaiters are.) We nicknamed this plant 'little devil' because it seemed to be poking us all the time! It's somewhere between a bush and a vine. The stems grow everywhere and are very tough to cut through.
    {Dots.png}

    On the RoadHi All! I thought I might share some pictures of my travels. One of the interesting things about doing field work is often getting to the place you are interested in studying. For my study, I was interested in finding a place that where there hadn't been a lot of buildings built or crops farmed. That meant driving a really long way away from cities and towns. Here's a map of how far I had to drive:
    The{Map.jpg}
    The
    other exciting
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    in Sydney: {Amanda_in_Sydney}
    So here's a few pictures from the drive. It took a few days -- first I had to drive to Sydney, then, from Sydney, it took three days to drive all the way to my dry-but-warm rainforest site. We stopped in Byron Bay, the town of 1770 (yes, that's it's name, 1770 -- it's named after the year that Captain Cook stopped in for a visit), Airlie Beach, and then, finally, one reeeally long day out to the Undara campground, where we stayed while we were working on the project. Here's some of the stuff we saw along the way.
    First of all, every good road trip needs food! We stopped for a meat pie in Fredrickton, New South Wales. Amanda had Kangaroo (that's the K that kind of looks like an H) and I had Lamb, Mint, and Honey (not sure why that one gets a B, but oh well.) Yum.
    {Pies.JPG}
    We had a rule that whenever we passed a 'big' thing, we would stop and take a picture. So here's a few...
    {BigPrawn.JPG} The BIG Prawn (that's what they call shrimp in Australia)
    ...
    Here is a mantis I saw in a tree-fall gap in the rainforest. As you might imagine, rainforests are usually pretty dark, due to all the trees growing there (thanks, captain obvious.) When a tree falls down, it clears a big hole in the canopy, which lets a lot of light through. So the plants and animals that live in the tree-fall gap are usually pretty different from the ones in the rest of the forest. This one was sunbathing perched on a giant fern.
    {Mantis.JPG}
    ...
    your cereal.
    {Bluewater_B_and_B_(1)-1.JPG} A Kangaroo
    Ok, I'm going to go get ready for my next trip now. I'm heading to Tasmania in about two weeks, so there is really a lot to get set. Maybe my next posting will be about some of the equipment I'm getting ready to take with me... or about making plans to take the car ferry (it is a pretty long trip... overnight!)
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Saturday, June 11

  1. msg This is great, Steph! message posted This is great, Steph! Where are you now? -- Nelson
    This is great, Steph!
    Where are you now?

    -- Nelson
    12:07 pm

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